My Day with Canonical

I’ve been researching OpenStack deployment methods lately and so when I got an email from Canonical inviting me to check out how they deploy OpenStack using their Metal as a Service (MaaS) software on their fantastic Orange Box demo platform I jumped at the opportunity. more>>

While digging into the last OpenStack User Survey, I found that Ubuntu Linux was the most popular OpenStack operating system.

http://www.zdnet.com/openstacks-top-operating-system-ubuntu-linux-7000027360/

According to an official OpenStack User Survey Ubuntu is the most used Operating System for production deployment of OpenStack. OpenStack is an Open Source project to build a framework for the creation of cloud platforms, predominately Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) platforms. The survey found that Ubuntu accounts for 55% of the host Operating Systems used for OpenStack deployments

http://www.muktware.com/2014/03/ubuntu-used-os-production-openstack-deployments/22311

Canonical’s new OpenStack Interoperability Lab (OIL) aims to give organizations assurance that Ubuntu OpenStack will play well with a variety of hardware and software.
OIL will test all new OpenStack hypervisors and software-defined networking (SDN) stacks, as well conventional OpenStack technologies, to make sure Ubuntu OpenStack offers a wide array of validated and supported technology options. Canonical leads development of Ubuntu.

Read more here

But…do you know about Ubuntu’s take on the cloud? What about OpenStack’s Havana? If you are in the dark on this new release, here are ten things you need to know that just might sell you on what Ubuntu has to offer.

http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/10-things/10-things-you-need-to-know-about-ubuntu-1310-openstack/

Please send information about releases of Linux-related products
to newproducts@linuxjournal.com or
New Products
c/o Linux Journal, PO Box 980985, Houston,
TX 77098. Submissions are edited for length and content.

If ever there was a master of doing live demos on a keynote stage, that master is Ubuntu Linux founder Mark Shuttleworth. Speaking at the OpenStack Summit here, Shuttleworth continued his tradition of doing a live demo of what many would normally consider to be difficult and time-consuming tasks.

http://www.serverwatch.com/server-news/mark-shuttleworth-pivots-ubuntu-openstack-with-cloudfoundry.html

On October 17th, Canonical, Ubuntu’s parent company, will release Ubuntu 13.10, Saucy Salamander. Most people will be interested in the desktop version of Ubuntu 13.10, but more people may actually end up using this latest Ubuntu distribution on the cloud than they will on the desktop.

http://www.zdnet.com/ubuntu-syncs-up-with-openstack-7000021878/

It doesn’t have the same kind of high-profile marketing machine as Red Hat, for example, but Ubuntu is the OS that’s driving many evolutionary cloud projects, including OpenStack.

http://www.informationweek.com/cloud-computing/platform/ubuntu-pushes-open-cloud-platforms/240162380


What is OpenStack?

You’ve probably heard of OpenStack. It’s that cloud software that’s getting a lot of attention
from big names in the IT industry and major users like CERN, Comcast and PayPal. However,
did you know that it’s more than that? It’s also the fastest growing open source community
in the world, and a very interesting collaboration among technology vendors and users. more>>

From the press release….Canonical and VMware, Inc. (NYSE: VMW), the global leader in virtualization and cloud infrastructure, today announced a collaboration that will enable organizations to deploy VMware technologies, including VMware vSphere(R) and Nicira NVP, with Canonical’s OpenStack distribution.

Read more here

One of the most important things of all to realize is that the Ubuntu Server 13.04 release that became available this week includes capabilities based on the “Grizzly” release of the populuar OpenStack cloud computing platform, and deepens Ubuntu’s relationship with OpenStack.

Read more here

Ubuntu 12.04 has been given its first point release update since the business-focused Linux distribution was launched in April, adding further ARM server support and an OpenStack cloud computing repository in addition to numerous security updates and fixes.

Read more here

“We see huge interest in OpenStack right now, both from cloud providers and from private enterprises,” Chris Kenyon, VP of Sales and Business Development at Canonical, told me. Read more here

Canonical has unveiled a beta version of AWSOME (Any Web Service Over ME), an open source proxy service that helps users who currently use Amazon Web Services (AWS) to migrate to OpenStack’s cloud computing platform. AWSOME will be included as an install option in the server edition of Ubuntu 12.04 LTS which is scheduled to be released later this month. Read more here

Canonical will release an application programmable interface (API) to bridge the gap between Openstack based clouds and those that run on Amazon Web Services. Read more here

Ubuntu Server 12.04 LTS (long-term support) is being built with the latest Linux kernel and OpenStack IT and is currently undergoing integration and quality assurance testing with Dell’s version of OpenStack. Read more here

Last week I sat on a panel at a U.S. State Department event that looked ahead at the future of technology. My assignment: Predict what mainstream IT will be like 25 to 30 years from now.

A friend suggested I simply say the two words “flying cars.” But I took the assignment seriously and conjured up my predictions the only way I knew how: Start with major problems IT faces today and guess how they will be solved. Coming up with IT’s four biggest problems was relatively easy.

Last week I sat on a panel at a U.S. State Department event that looked ahead at the future of technology. My assignment: Predict what mainstream IT will be like 25 to 30 years from now.

A friend suggested I simply say the two words “flying cars.” But I took the assignment seriously and conjured up my predictions the only way I knew how: Start with major problems IT faces today and guess how they will be solved. Coming up with IT’s four biggest problems was relatively easy.

Last week I sat on a panel at a U.S. State Department event that looked ahead at the future of technology. My assignment: Predict what mainstream IT will be like 25 to 30 years from now.

A friend suggested I simply say the two words “flying cars.” But I took the assignment seriously and conjured up my predictions the only way I knew how: Start with major problems IT faces today and guess how they will be solved. Coming up with IT’s four biggest problems was relatively easy.