mrspoonsi writes Hewlett-Packard is planning to split itself into two separate businesses, The Wall Street Journal is reporting. Sources tell the WSJ that HP will split its personal-computer and printer segments from its corporate hardware and services business. The announcement could come as early as Monday, the sources said. The company reorganized itself in 2012 under CEO Meg Whitman. That move combined its computer and printer businesses. The PC and computer segment is massive for HP. For the first six months this year, it reported $27.8 billion in revenue. That’s about three times the size of HP’s next biggest unit, the Enterprise Group, which makes servers, storage, and network hardware. Under the new split, Whitman would be chairman of the computer and printer business, and CEO of a separate Enterprise Group, according to one of the sources. Patricia Russo, who sits on HP’s board, would be chairman of the enterprise company. The printer and PC operation would be led by Dion Weisler, a current exec in that division.”

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jfruh writes While Windows-based tablets haven’t exactly set the world on fire, Microsoft hasn’t given up on them, and its hardware partners haven’t either. HP has announced a series of Windows tablets, with the 7-inch low-end model, the Stream 7, priced at $99. The Stream brand is also being used for low-priced laptops intended to compete with Chromebooks (which HP also sells). All are running Intel chips and full Windows, not Windows RT.

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jfruh writes: In 2010, HP tried to buy its way into the analytics game by shelling out billions for Autonomy, a deal that was a famous disaster. But that isn’t stopping the company from making big buys: it will be buying Eucalyptus, a cloud provider headed by ex-MySQL AB CEO Marten Mickos, and bringing Mickos in to head the new HP Cloud division.

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The Washington Post carries a story from the Associated Press that says the big companies hit hardest by Judge Lucy Koh’s ruling in the “No Poaching” case have not suprisingly appealed that ruling, which found that a proposed settlement of $324.5 million to a class-action lawsuit was too low. The suit, filed on behalf of 60,000 high-tech workers allegedlly harmed by anti-competitive hiring practices, will probably enter its next phase next January or March. (Judge Koh is probably not very popular at Apple in particular.) If you’re one of those workers (or in an analogous situation), what kind of compensation or punitive action do you think is fair?

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Via the Consumerist comes news that HP is recalling power cables after about 30 reports that they were melting from regular use. From the article: Hewlett-Packard received 29 reports of the melting or charring power cords, two that included claims of minor burns and 13 claims of minor property damage. The black power cords were distributed with HP and Compaq notebook and mini notebook computers and with AC adapter-powered accessories such as docking stations and have an “LS-15″ molded mark on the AC adapter. About 5.6 million power cords were sold in the United States, while 446,700 were sold in Canada from September 2010 to June 2012 at electronic stores and hp.com.

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dcblogs (1096431) writes Hewlett-Packard has changed its direction on OpenVMS. Instead of pushing its users off the system, it has licensed OpenVMS to a new firm that plans to develop ports to the latest Itanium chips and is promising eventual support for x86 processors. Last year, HP put OpenVMS on the path to extinction. It said it would not validate the operating system to its latest hardware or produce new versions of it. The move to license the OpenVMS source code to a new entity, VMS Software Inc. (VSI), amounts to a reversal of that earlier decision. VSI plans to validate the operating system on Intel’s Itanium eight-core Poulson chips by early 2015, as well as support for HP hardware running the upcoming ‘Kittson’ chip. It will also develop an x86 port, although it isn’t specifying a timeframe. And it plans to develop new versions of OpenVMS.

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Didn’t we already have something kind of like this called a Blade server? But this is better! An HP Web page devoted to Moonshot says, ‘Compared to traditional servers, up to: 89% less energy; 80% less space; 77% less cost; and 97% less complex.’ If this is all true, the world of servers is now undergoing a radical change. || A quote from another Moonshot page: “The HP Moonshot 1500 Chassis has 45 hot-pluggable servers installed and fits into 4.3U. The density comes in part from the low-energy, efficient processors. The innovative chassis design supports 45 servers, 2 network switches, and supporting components.’ These are software-defined servers. HP claims they are the first ones ever, a claim that may depend on how you define “software-defined.” And what software defines them? In this case, at Texas Linux Fest, it seems to be Ubuntu Linux. (Alternate Video Link)

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jfruh (300774) writes HP’s revelation that it’s working on a radical new computing architecture that it’s dubbed “The Machine” was met with excitement among tech observers this week, but one of HP’s biggest competitors remains extremely unimpressed. John Swanson, the head of Dell’s software business, said that “The notion that you can reach some magical state by rearchitecting an OS is laughable on the face of it.” And Jai Memnon, Dell’s research head, said that phase-change memory is the memory type in the pipeline mostly like to change the computing scene soon, not the memristors that HP is working on.

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pacopico writes: HP Labs is trying to make a comeback. According to Businessweek, HP is building something called The Machine. It’s a type of computer architecture that will use memristors for memory and silicon photonics for interconnects. Their plan is to ship within the next few years. As for The Machine’s software, HP plans to build a new operating system to run on the novel hardware. The new computer is meant to solve a coming crisis due to limitations around DRAM and Flash. About three-quarters of HP Labs personnel are working on this project.

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Ars Technica reports that HP is back in the $100 tablet market, and this time with a tablet that’s intended to be priced there instead of just a fire sale. The new offering lacks Bluetooth and GPS, among other features you might wish for in a tablet, and the screen is surrounded by a hefty bezel, but manages a pretty good list of features. Ars summarizes: “For $100, you can’t expect much of the spec sheet. The HP 7 Plus has a 7-inch 1024×600 IPS display, a 1GHz quad-core Cortex A7 processor (made by a company called “Allwinner”), 1GB of RAM, 8GB of storage, 802.11 b/g/n, a microSD slot, and a 2800 mAh battery. The biggest downside HP could have fixed at this price point is the software: it’s only running Android 4.2.2. Android versions are free, HP.” Having an avaialble microSD slot beats some more expensive options, too.

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jfruh (300774) writes “Good news for HP: Profits are up by 18% over the previous year! Bad news for HP: A lot of those profits are from post-Windows XP PC upgrades, and company revenue actually dipped 1%. The solution, according to CEO Meg Whitman, is “continuous improvement in our cost structure,” which means firing thousands of people. At the end of the next round of layoffs, the company will have shed 50,000 employees since 2012.” New submitter Deveauxes (3664417) links to a similar story from CNN’s news service, according to which “HP said the latest layoffs would come across all its business units and geographic locations, and would generate $1 billion in annual savings beyond the $3.5 to $4 billion projected from the previously announced cuts. ‘No company likes to decrease the work force, and we recognize that this is difficult for employees,’ CEO Meg Whitman said in a conference call with analysts. ‘I think everyone understands the turnaround we’re in.’”

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schwit1 writes “According to the Inspector General, NASA and HP Enterprise Services have encountered significant problems implementing the $2.5 billion Agency Consolidated End-User Services (ACES) contract, which provides desktops, laptops, computer equipment and end-user services such as help desk and data backup. Those problems include ‘a failed effort to replace most NASA employees’ computers within the first six months and low customer satisfaction,’ the report states (PDF). It adds that NASA lacked the technical and cultural readiness for an agencywide IT delivery model and did not offer clear contract requirements, while HP failed to deliver on multiple promises.”

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New submitter josh itnc writes “In a move that is sure to put a wedge between HP and their customers, today, HP has issued an email informing all existing Enterprise Server customers that they would no longer be able to access or download service packs, firmware patches and bug-fixes for their server hardware without a valid support agreement in place. They said, ‘HP has made significant investments in its intellectual capital to provide the best value and experience for our customers. We continue to offer a differentiated customer experience with our comprehensive support portfolio. … Only HP customers and authorized channel partners may download and use support materials. In line with this commitment, starting in February 2014, Hewlett-Packard Company will change the way firmware updates and Service Pack for ProLiant (SPP) on HP ProLiant server products are accessed. Select server firmware and SPP on these products will only be accessed through the HP Support Center to customers with an active support agreement, HP CarePack, or warranty linked to their HP Support Center User ID and for the specific products being updated.’ If a manufacturer ships hardware with exploitable defects and takes more than three years to identify them, should the consumer have to pay for the vendor to fix the these defects?”

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sfcrazy writes “In a surprising and unexpected move, Google and its partners have removed the recently launched HP Chromebook 11 from shelves. Users were complaining about the issues with the trackpad and performance of the laptop.” Specifically (as also reported by the Seattle Post-Intelligencer), some of the laptops have been reported to overheat.

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An anonymous reader writes “HP has been the sole holdout on the Itanium, mostly because so much of the PA-RISC architecture lives on in that chip. However, the company recently began migration of Integrity Superdome servers from Itanium to Xeon, and now it has announced that the top of its server line, the NonStop series, will migrate to x86 as well, presumably the 15-core E7 V2 Intel will release next year. So while no one has said it, this likely seems the end of the Itanium experiment, one that went on a lot longer than it should have, given its failure out of the gate.”

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Lucas123 writes “HP has filed a lawsuit against seven makers of optical disk drive technology, claiming the companies engaged in widespread price fixing in order to drive up the cost of Blu-ray, DVD and CD drives for PC and peripheral equipment makers. The suit was filed Thursday at the district court in Houston against Toshiba, Samsung, Sony, Panasonic, NEC, TEAC and Quanta Storage. The lawsuit claims the conspiracy to drive up prices took place from at least Jan. 1, 2004 through Jan. 1, 2010, when “almost all forms of home entertainment and data storage were on optical discs” and the companies controlled 90% of the optical disk market. HP alleges the companies used industry events, such as CES, as cover to communicate competitive information and hammer out anticompetitive agreements.”

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judgecorp writes “Hewlett-Packard wants to cash in a lot of mobile patents, as part of Meg Whitman’s restructuring, according to reports. HP acquired the WebOS operating system, as seen on phones and tablets, when it bought Palm, but failed to build a business on it. It’s since sold its WebOS business to LG for use in TVs and cars but hung onto the patents which are licensed to LG. Now, Bloomberg reports the patents themselves may be for sale — possibly to whoever fails to buy BlackBerry’s tempting bundle of mobile technology.”

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McGruber writes “AllThingsD has the news that Hewlett-Packard has enacted a policy requiring most employees to work from the office and not from home. According to an undated question-and-answer document distributed to HP employees, the new policy is aimed at instigating a cultural shift that ‘will help create a more connected workforce and drive greater collaboration and innovation.’ The memo also said, ‘During this critical turnaround period, HP needs all hands on deck. We recognize that in the past, we may have asked certain employees to work from home for various reasons. We now need to build a stronger culture of engagement and collaboration and the more employees we get into the office the better company we will be.’ One major complication is that numerous HP offices don’t have sufficient space to accommodate all of their employees. According to sources familiar with the company’s operations, as many as 80,000 employees, and possibly more, were working from home in part because the company didn’t have desks for them all within its own buildings.”

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McGruber writes “AllThingsD has the news that Hewlett-Packard has enacted a policy requiring most employees to work from the office and not from home. According to an undated question-and-answer document distributed to HP employees, the new policy is aimed at instigating a cultural shift that ‘will help create a more connected workforce and drive greater collaboration and innovation.’ The memo also said, ‘During this critical turnaround period, HP needs all hands on deck. We recognize that in the past, we may have asked certain employees to work from home for various reasons. We now need to build a stronger culture of engagement and collaboration and the more employees we get into the office the better company we will be.’ One major complication is that numerous HP offices don’t have sufficient space to accommodate all of their employees. According to sources familiar with the company’s operations, as many as 80,000 employees, and possibly more, were working from home in part because the company didn’t have desks for them all within its own buildings.”

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China is still a major player in the computer market and manufacturers are chomping at the bit to take advantage of it. Today, Canonical announces that Hewlett Packard is focused on the nation and will be selling Ubuntu-based laptops in its 1,500 retail stores.

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