Didn’t we already have something kind of like this called a Blade server? But this is better! An HP Web page devoted to Moonshot says, ‘Compared to traditional servers, up to: 89% less energy; 80% less space; 77% less cost; and 97% less complex.’ If this is all true, the world of servers is now undergoing a radical change. || A quote from another Moonshot page: “The HP Moonshot 1500 Chassis has 45 hot-pluggable servers installed and fits into 4.3U. The density comes in part from the low-energy, efficient processors. The innovative chassis design supports 45 servers, 2 network switches, and supporting components.’ These are software-defined servers. HP claims they are the first ones ever, a claim that may depend on how you define “software-defined.” And what software defines them? In this case, at Texas Linux Fest, it seems to be Ubuntu Linux. (Alternate Video Link)

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jfruh (300774) writes HP’s revelation that it’s working on a radical new computing architecture that it’s dubbed “The Machine” was met with excitement among tech observers this week, but one of HP’s biggest competitors remains extremely unimpressed. John Swanson, the head of Dell’s software business, said that “The notion that you can reach some magical state by rearchitecting an OS is laughable on the face of it.” And Jai Memnon, Dell’s research head, said that phase-change memory is the memory type in the pipeline mostly like to change the computing scene soon, not the memristors that HP is working on.

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pacopico writes: HP Labs is trying to make a comeback. According to Businessweek, HP is building something called The Machine. It’s a type of computer architecture that will use memristors for memory and silicon photonics for interconnects. Their plan is to ship within the next few years. As for The Machine’s software, HP plans to build a new operating system to run on the novel hardware. The new computer is meant to solve a coming crisis due to limitations around DRAM and Flash. About three-quarters of HP Labs personnel are working on this project.

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Ars Technica reports that HP is back in the $100 tablet market, and this time with a tablet that’s intended to be priced there instead of just a fire sale. The new offering lacks Bluetooth and GPS, among other features you might wish for in a tablet, and the screen is surrounded by a hefty bezel, but manages a pretty good list of features. Ars summarizes: “For $100, you can’t expect much of the spec sheet. The HP 7 Plus has a 7-inch 1024×600 IPS display, a 1GHz quad-core Cortex A7 processor (made by a company called “Allwinner”), 1GB of RAM, 8GB of storage, 802.11 b/g/n, a microSD slot, and a 2800 mAh battery. The biggest downside HP could have fixed at this price point is the software: it’s only running Android 4.2.2. Android versions are free, HP.” Having an avaialble microSD slot beats some more expensive options, too.

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jfruh (300774) writes “Good news for HP: Profits are up by 18% over the previous year! Bad news for HP: A lot of those profits are from post-Windows XP PC upgrades, and company revenue actually dipped 1%. The solution, according to CEO Meg Whitman, is “continuous improvement in our cost structure,” which means firing thousands of people. At the end of the next round of layoffs, the company will have shed 50,000 employees since 2012.” New submitter Deveauxes (3664417) links to a similar story from CNN’s news service, according to which “HP said the latest layoffs would come across all its business units and geographic locations, and would generate $1 billion in annual savings beyond the $3.5 to $4 billion projected from the previously announced cuts. ‘No company likes to decrease the work force, and we recognize that this is difficult for employees,’ CEO Meg Whitman said in a conference call with analysts. ‘I think everyone understands the turnaround we’re in.’”

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schwit1 writes “According to the Inspector General, NASA and HP Enterprise Services have encountered significant problems implementing the $2.5 billion Agency Consolidated End-User Services (ACES) contract, which provides desktops, laptops, computer equipment and end-user services such as help desk and data backup. Those problems include ‘a failed effort to replace most NASA employees’ computers within the first six months and low customer satisfaction,’ the report states (PDF). It adds that NASA lacked the technical and cultural readiness for an agencywide IT delivery model and did not offer clear contract requirements, while HP failed to deliver on multiple promises.”

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New submitter josh itnc writes “In a move that is sure to put a wedge between HP and their customers, today, HP has issued an email informing all existing Enterprise Server customers that they would no longer be able to access or download service packs, firmware patches and bug-fixes for their server hardware without a valid support agreement in place. They said, ‘HP has made significant investments in its intellectual capital to provide the best value and experience for our customers. We continue to offer a differentiated customer experience with our comprehensive support portfolio. … Only HP customers and authorized channel partners may download and use support materials. In line with this commitment, starting in February 2014, Hewlett-Packard Company will change the way firmware updates and Service Pack for ProLiant (SPP) on HP ProLiant server products are accessed. Select server firmware and SPP on these products will only be accessed through the HP Support Center to customers with an active support agreement, HP CarePack, or warranty linked to their HP Support Center User ID and for the specific products being updated.’ If a manufacturer ships hardware with exploitable defects and takes more than three years to identify them, should the consumer have to pay for the vendor to fix the these defects?”

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sfcrazy writes “In a surprising and unexpected move, Google and its partners have removed the recently launched HP Chromebook 11 from shelves. Users were complaining about the issues with the trackpad and performance of the laptop.” Specifically (as also reported by the Seattle Post-Intelligencer), some of the laptops have been reported to overheat.

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An anonymous reader writes “HP has been the sole holdout on the Itanium, mostly because so much of the PA-RISC architecture lives on in that chip. However, the company recently began migration of Integrity Superdome servers from Itanium to Xeon, and now it has announced that the top of its server line, the NonStop series, will migrate to x86 as well, presumably the 15-core E7 V2 Intel will release next year. So while no one has said it, this likely seems the end of the Itanium experiment, one that went on a lot longer than it should have, given its failure out of the gate.”

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Lucas123 writes “HP has filed a lawsuit against seven makers of optical disk drive technology, claiming the companies engaged in widespread price fixing in order to drive up the cost of Blu-ray, DVD and CD drives for PC and peripheral equipment makers. The suit was filed Thursday at the district court in Houston against Toshiba, Samsung, Sony, Panasonic, NEC, TEAC and Quanta Storage. The lawsuit claims the conspiracy to drive up prices took place from at least Jan. 1, 2004 through Jan. 1, 2010, when “almost all forms of home entertainment and data storage were on optical discs” and the companies controlled 90% of the optical disk market. HP alleges the companies used industry events, such as CES, as cover to communicate competitive information and hammer out anticompetitive agreements.”

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judgecorp writes “Hewlett-Packard wants to cash in a lot of mobile patents, as part of Meg Whitman’s restructuring, according to reports. HP acquired the WebOS operating system, as seen on phones and tablets, when it bought Palm, but failed to build a business on it. It’s since sold its WebOS business to LG for use in TVs and cars but hung onto the patents which are licensed to LG. Now, Bloomberg reports the patents themselves may be for sale — possibly to whoever fails to buy BlackBerry’s tempting bundle of mobile technology.”

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McGruber writes “AllThingsD has the news that Hewlett-Packard has enacted a policy requiring most employees to work from the office and not from home. According to an undated question-and-answer document distributed to HP employees, the new policy is aimed at instigating a cultural shift that ‘will help create a more connected workforce and drive greater collaboration and innovation.’ The memo also said, ‘During this critical turnaround period, HP needs all hands on deck. We recognize that in the past, we may have asked certain employees to work from home for various reasons. We now need to build a stronger culture of engagement and collaboration and the more employees we get into the office the better company we will be.’ One major complication is that numerous HP offices don’t have sufficient space to accommodate all of their employees. According to sources familiar with the company’s operations, as many as 80,000 employees, and possibly more, were working from home in part because the company didn’t have desks for them all within its own buildings.”

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McGruber writes “AllThingsD has the news that Hewlett-Packard has enacted a policy requiring most employees to work from the office and not from home. According to an undated question-and-answer document distributed to HP employees, the new policy is aimed at instigating a cultural shift that ‘will help create a more connected workforce and drive greater collaboration and innovation.’ The memo also said, ‘During this critical turnaround period, HP needs all hands on deck. We recognize that in the past, we may have asked certain employees to work from home for various reasons. We now need to build a stronger culture of engagement and collaboration and the more employees we get into the office the better company we will be.’ One major complication is that numerous HP offices don’t have sufficient space to accommodate all of their employees. According to sources familiar with the company’s operations, as many as 80,000 employees, and possibly more, were working from home in part because the company didn’t have desks for them all within its own buildings.”

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China is still a major player in the computer market and manufacturers are chomping at the bit to take advantage of it. Today, Canonical announces that Hewlett Packard is focused on the nation and will be selling Ubuntu-based laptops in its 1,500 retail stores.

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theodp writes “GeekWire reports that HP has named former Microsoft chief software architect Ray Ozzie to its Board of Directors. Ozzie, known for his early work on collaboration technologies including Lotus Notes, has been working on his own startup since leaving Microsoft in 2010. Ozzie recently sounded off on the NSA spygate affair, suggesting it’s time to revisit the deal we made with the 9/11-privacy-devil.”

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Nerval’s Lobster writes “For the second time in a month, Hewlett-Packard has been forced to admit it built secret backdoors into its enterprise storage products. The admission, in a security bulletin posted July 9, confirms reports from the blogger Technion, who flagged the security issue in HP’s StoreOnce systems in June, before finding more backdoors in other HP storage and SAN products. The most recent statement from HP, following another warning from Technion, admitted that ‘all HP StoreVirtual Storage systems are equipped with a mechanism that allows HP support to access the underlying operating system if permission and access is provided by the customer.’ While HP describes the backdoors as being usable only with permission of the customer, that restriction is part of HP’s own customer-service rules—not a limitation built in to limit use of backdoors. The entry points consist of a hidden administrator account with root access to StoreVirtual systems and software, and a separate copy of the LeftHand OS, the software that runs HP’s StoreVirtual and HP P4000 products. Even with root access, the secret admin account does not give support techs or hackers access to data stored on the HP machines, according to the company. But it does provide enough access and control over the hardware in a storage cluster to reboot specific nodes, which would ‘cripple the cluster,’ according to information provided to The Register by an unnamed source. The account also provides access to a factory-reset control that would allow intruders to destroy much of the data and configurations of a network of HP storage products. And it’s not hard to find: ‘Open up your favourite SSH client, key in the IP of an HP D2D unit. Enter in yourself the username HPSupport, and the password which has a SHA1 of 78a7ecf065324604540ad3c41c3bb8fe1d084c50. Say hello to an administrative account you didn’t know existed,’ according to Technion, who claims to have attempted to notify HP for weeks with no result before deciding to go public.”

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wiredmikey writes “Security response personnel at HP are ‘actively working on a fix’ for a potentially dangerous backdoor in older versions of its StoreOnce backup product line. The company’s confirmation of what it describes as a ‘potential security issue’ follows the public disclosure that malicious hackers can use SSH access to perform full remote compromise of HP’s StoreOnce backup systems. The SHA1 hash for the password was also published, putting pressure on HP to get a fix ready for affected customers. SecurityWeek has confirmed that it is relatively trivial to brute-force the hash to obtain the seven-character password. The HP StoreOnce product, previously known as HP D2D, provides disk backup and recovery to small- to midsize businesses, large enterprises, remote offices and cloud service providers.”

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simpz writes “The register is reporting that ‘the ancient but trustworthy server operating system’ OpenVMS has been discontinued. From the article: ‘HP never really promoted its acquisition and OpenVMS suffered from a lack of development compared to HP-UX, itself suffering from competition from Linux. It was only a matter of time, but it’s a sad end. Many of its old-time fans, your correspondent included, cherished a hope HP would move it to x86-64 – but since development moved to India in 2009, OpenVMS has been living on borrowed time. Now, it’s run out.’”

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cylonlover writes “It hasn’t even been released yet but the Leap Motion could already be considered something of a success – at least with PC manufacturers. Following in the footsteps of Asus, who announced in January that it would bundle the 3D motion controller with some of its PCs, the world’s biggest PC manufacturer has joined the gesture control party. But HP has gone one step further, promising to build the Leap Motion technology into some future HP devices.” (See this video for scenes of users scrabbling with their hands in empty air, and get ready for more of it.)

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HP Launches Moonshot

New submitter linatux writes “HP has announced their ‘Moonshot 1500 server’ — up to 1,800 servers per 47U rack are supported. The tech certainly seems to be an advance on what is currently available — will it be enough to revive HP’s server fleet?” From Phoronix: “Moonshot began with Calxeda-based ARM SoCs, but in the end HP settled for Intel Atom processors. Released today were HP’s Moonshot system based on the Intel Atom S1200. Hewlett-Packard claims that their Moonshot System uses 89% less energy, 80% less space, 77% less cost, and 97% less complexity than traditional servers.”

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