Most USB devices have a fundamental security weakness that can be exploited to infect computers with malware in a way that cannot easily be prevented or detected, security researchers found.

The problem is that the majority of USB thumb drives, and likely other USB peripherals available on the market, do not protect their firmware — the software that runs on the microcontroller inside them, said Karsten Nohl, the founder and chief scientist of Berlin-based Security Research Labs.

A zero-day flaw in a software driver in Symantec’s widely used Endpoint Protection product may be tricky to fix.

The flaw is contained in the Application and Device Control driver, which is in Endpoint Protection versions 11.x and 12.x, the security company wrote in an advisory on Wednesday.

A zero-day flaw in a software driver in Symantec’s widely used Endpoint Protection product may be tricky to fix.

The flaw is contained in the Application and Device Control driver, which is in Endpoint Protection versions 11.x and 12.x, the security company wrote in an advisory on Wednesday.

It’s generally accepted that antivirus programs provide a necessary protection layer, but organizations should audit such products before deploying them on their systems because many of them contain serious vulnerabilities, a researcher warned.

According to Joxean Koret, a researcher at Singapore security firm Coseinc, antivirus programs are as vulnerable to attacks as the applications they’re trying to protect and expose a large attack surface that can make computers even more vulnerable.

It’s generally accepted that antivirus programs provide a necessary protection layer, but organizations should audit such products before deploying them on their systems because many of them contain serious vulnerabilities, a researcher warned.

According to Joxean Koret, a researcher at Singapore security firm Coseinc, antivirus programs are as vulnerable to attacks as the applications they’re trying to protect and expose a large attack surface that can make computers even more vulnerable.

Symantec’s Endpoint Protection product has three zero-day flaws that could allow a logged-in user to move to a higher access level on a computer, according to a penetration testing and training company.

The three flaws, all known as privilege escalation vulnerabilities, were found during a security test of a financial services company, said Mati Aharoni, lead trainer and developer for Offensive Security, in a phone interview late Tuesday.

Symantec’s Endpoint Protection product has three zero-day flaws that could allow a logged-in user to move to a higher access level on a computer, according to a penetration testing and training company.

The three flaws, all known as privilege escalation vulnerabilities, were found during a security test of a financial services company, said Mati Aharoni, lead trainer and developer for Offensive Security, in a phone interview late Tuesday.

In today’s threatscape, antivirus software provides little piece of mind, and antimalware scanners on the whole are horrifically inaccurate, especially with exploits less than 24 hours old. Despite modern heuristics, virtualized environments, system monitoring, and network traffic detection, hackers still reach us on a regular basis. 

In today’s threatscape, antivirus software provides little piece of mind, and antimalware scanners on the whole are horrifically inaccurate, especially with exploits less than 24 hours old. Despite modern heuristics, virtualized environments, system monitoring, and network traffic detection, hackers still reach us on a regular basis. 

Two glimmers of hope for enterprise security

Enterprise security has become the breach-of-the month club.

Two glimmers of hope for enterprise security

Enterprise security has become the breach-of-the month club.

Your device, your data: Don't let IT screw up your iPhone or iPad

Credit: iStockphoto

Your device, your data: Don't let IT screw up your iPhone or iPad

Credit: iStockphoto

Microsoft on Tuesday warned customers that its malware detection engine, used in a wide range of its products including Security Essentials and Windows Defender, could be disabled if an attacker sent a malformed file as an email attachment.

Along with the security alert, Microsoft issued an update to patch the vulnerability.

Microsoft on Tuesday warned customers that its malware detection engine, used in a wide range of its products including Security Essentials and Windows Defender, could be disabled if an attacker sent a malformed file as an email attachment.

Along with the security alert, Microsoft issued an update to patch the vulnerability.

The recent effort to disrupt the Gameover Zeus botnet includes plans for Internet service providers to notify victims, but some security researchers think ISPs should play an even bigger role in the future by actively quarantining infected computers identified on their networks.

The recent effort to disrupt the Gameover Zeus botnet includes plans for Internet service providers to notify victims, but some security researchers think ISPs should play an even bigger role in the future by actively quarantining infected computers identified on their networks.

The recent effort to disrupt the Gameover Zeus botnet includes plans for Internet service providers to notify victims, but some security researchers think ISPs should play an even bigger role in the future by actively quarantining infected computers identified on their networks.

You know that a trend has peaked when the establishment jumps on board. That’s happening in the world of mobile management, pioneered years ago by niche companies such as Good Technology and Zenprise and startups like MobileIron and AirWatch. Now, establishment companies such as CA Technologies, Citrix Systems (which bought Zenprise), Dell, EMC VMware (which bought AirWatch), IBM, and Microsoft are aggressively pushing their mobile management tools.

You know that a trend has peaked when the establishment jumps on board. That’s happening in the world of mobile management, pioneered years ago by niche companies such as Good Technology and Zenprise and startups like MobileIron and AirWatch. Now, establishment companies such as CA Technologies, Citrix Systems (which bought Zenprise), Dell, EMC VMware (which bought AirWatch), IBM, and Microsoft are aggressively pushing their mobile management tools.