Two glimmers of hope for enterprise security

Enterprise security has become the breach-of-the month club.

Your device, your data: Don't let IT screw up your iPhone or iPad

Credit: iStockphoto

Your device, your data: Don't let IT screw up your iPhone or iPad

Credit: iStockphoto

Microsoft on Tuesday warned customers that its malware detection engine, used in a wide range of its products including Security Essentials and Windows Defender, could be disabled if an attacker sent a malformed file as an email attachment.

Along with the security alert, Microsoft issued an update to patch the vulnerability.

Microsoft on Tuesday warned customers that its malware detection engine, used in a wide range of its products including Security Essentials and Windows Defender, could be disabled if an attacker sent a malformed file as an email attachment.

Along with the security alert, Microsoft issued an update to patch the vulnerability.

The recent effort to disrupt the Gameover Zeus botnet includes plans for Internet service providers to notify victims, but some security researchers think ISPs should play an even bigger role in the future by actively quarantining infected computers identified on their networks.

The recent effort to disrupt the Gameover Zeus botnet includes plans for Internet service providers to notify victims, but some security researchers think ISPs should play an even bigger role in the future by actively quarantining infected computers identified on their networks.

The recent effort to disrupt the Gameover Zeus botnet includes plans for Internet service providers to notify victims, but some security researchers think ISPs should play an even bigger role in the future by actively quarantining infected computers identified on their networks.

You know that a trend has peaked when the establishment jumps on board. That’s happening in the world of mobile management, pioneered years ago by niche companies such as Good Technology and Zenprise and startups like MobileIron and AirWatch. Now, establishment companies such as CA Technologies, Citrix Systems (which bought Zenprise), Dell, EMC VMware (which bought AirWatch), IBM, and Microsoft are aggressively pushing their mobile management tools.

You know that a trend has peaked when the establishment jumps on board. That’s happening in the world of mobile management, pioneered years ago by niche companies such as Good Technology and Zenprise and startups like MobileIron and AirWatch. Now, establishment companies such as CA Technologies, Citrix Systems (which bought Zenprise), Dell, EMC VMware (which bought AirWatch), IBM, and Microsoft are aggressively pushing their mobile management tools.

You know that a trend has peaked when the establishment jumps on board. That’s happening in the world of mobile management, pioneered years ago by niche companies such as Good Technology and Zenprise and startups like MobileIron and AirWatch. Now, establishment companies such as CA Technologies, Citrix Systems (which bought Zenprise), Dell, EMC VMware (which bought AirWatch), IBM, and Microsoft are aggressively pushing their mobile management tools.

Beware the next circle of hell: Unpatchable systems

Microsoft’s decision to end support for Windows XP in April was met with a collective gulp by the IT community.

Beware the next circle of hell: Unpatchable systems

Microsoft’s decision to end support for Windows XP in April was met with a collective gulp by the IT community.

Beware the next circle of hell: Unpatchable systems

Microsoft’s decision to end support for Windows XP in April was met with a collective gulp by the IT community.

A new computer Trojan that targets users of 450 financial institutions from around the world appears to borrow functionality and features directly from the notorious Zeus and Carberp malware programs.

5 ways computer security has truly advanced

As you may know, I like to rant about the poor state of computer security. I have reason to, because each year it appears we’re losing the battle as more and more systems get exploited.

USE STORY HED HERE

On April 26, Microsoft announced a new critical zero-day flaw in Internet Explorer.

USE STORY HED HERE

On April 26, Microsoft announced a new critical zero-day flaw in Internet Explorer.

USE STORY HED HERE

On April 26, Microsoft announced a new critical zero-day flaw in Internet Explorer.

The right way to secure the Internet of things

Credit: VLADGRIN