The right way to secure the Internet of things

Credit: VLADGRIN

The right way to secure the Internet of things

Credit: VLADGRIN

The right way to secure the Internet of things

Credit: VLADGRIN

The right way to secure the Internet of things

Credit: VLADGRIN

Jose Vildoza’s 62-year-old father was using his old Windows computer when a warning in broken English flashed on the screen: your files have been encrypted.

Vildoza’s father, who speaks Spanish, didn’t understand the warning, which demanded payment in order to decrypt the files. When Vildoza looked at it, he knew it was bad. And he became angry.

Jose Vildoza’s 62-year-old father was using his old Windows computer when a warning in broken English flashed on the screen: your files have been encrypted.

Vildoza’s father, who speaks Spanish, didn’t understand the warning, which demanded payment in order to decrypt the files. When Vildoza looked at it, he knew it was bad. And he became angry.

Microsoft has toughened its criteria for classifying programs as adware and gave developers three months to conform with the new principles or risk having their programs blocked by the company’s security products.

The most important change in Microsoft’s policy is that adware programs will be blocked by default starting July 1. In the past such programs were allowed to run until users chose one of the recommended actions offered by the company’s security software.

Microsoft has toughened its criteria for classifying programs as adware and gave developers three months to conform with the new principles or risk having their programs blocked by the company’s security products.

The most important change in Microsoft’s policy is that adware programs will be blocked by default starting July 1. In the past such programs were allowed to run until users chose one of the recommended actions offered by the company’s security software.

Microsoft has toughened its criteria for classifying programs as adware and gave developers three months to conform with the new principles or risk having their programs blocked by the company’s security products.

The most important change in Microsoft’s policy is that adware programs will be blocked by default starting July 1. In the past such programs were allowed to run until users chose one of the recommended actions offered by the company’s security software.

You want to know who has access to what? Good luck

Credit: iStockphoto

You want to know who has access to what? Good luck

Credit: iStockphoto

You want to know who has access to what? Good luck

Credit: iStockphoto

TITLE

Apple’s Mac computers and its OS X operating system have enjoyed a reputation of being relatively secure over the years. But in fact, experts say, the Apple OS has had security issues that might have been downplayed only because the vulnerabilities were not exploited.

TITLE

Apple’s Mac computers and its OS X operating system have enjoyed a reputation of being relatively secure over the years. But in fact, experts say, the Apple OS has had security issues that might have been downplayed only because the vulnerabilities were not exploited.

TITLE

Apple’s Mac computers and its OS X operating system have enjoyed a reputation of being relatively secure over the years. But in fact, experts say, the Apple OS has had security issues that might have been downplayed only because the vulnerabilities were not exploited.

There’s no disputing that DNS is a critical component of computer networking. However, if they fall into the wrong hands, these network tools can be abused to generate a DDoS attack — one of the most destructive weapons on the Internet. These seemingly simple barrages have taken down big names across the Internet, and you don’t want to be one of the victims.

There’s no disputing that DNS is a critical component of computer networking. However, if they fall into the wrong hands, these network tools can be abused to generate a DDoS attack — one of the most destructive weapons on the Internet. These seemingly simple barrages have taken down big names across the Internet, and you don’t want to be one of the victims.

There’s no disputing that DNS is a critical component of computer networking. However, if they fall into the wrong hands, these network tools can be abused to generate a DDoS attack — one of the most destructive weapons on the Internet. These seemingly simple barrages have taken down big names across the Internet, and you don’t want to be one of the victims.

Security researchers managed to bypass the protections offered by Microsoft’s EMET (Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit), a utility designed to detect and block software exploits, and concluded that the tool would not be effective against determined attackers.

Security researchers managed to bypass the protections offered by Microsoft’s EMET (Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit), a utility designed to detect and block software exploits, and concluded that the tool would not be effective against determined attackers.