Nexus Unplugged (2495076) writes ‘On their security blog today, Google announced a new Chrome extension called “End-To-End” intended to make browser-based encryption of messages easier for users. The extension, which was rumored to be “underway” a couple months ago, is currently in an “alpha” version and is not yet available pre-packaged or in the Chrome Web Store. It utilizes a Javascript implementation of OpenPGP, meaning that your private keys are never sent to Google. However, if you’d like to use the extension on multiple machines, its keyring is saved in localStorage, which can be encrypted with a passphrase before being synced. The extension still qualifies for Google’s Vulnerability Reward Program, and joins a host of PGP-related extensions already available for Chrome.’ Google also published a report showing how much email is encrypted in transit between Gmail addresses and those from other providers.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




An anonymous reader writes “Google has begun blocking local Chrome extensions to protect Windows users. This means that as of today, extensions can be installed in Chrome for Windows only if they’re hosted on the Chrome Web Store. Furthermore, Google says extensions that were previously installed ‘may be automatically disabled and cannot be re-enabled or re-installed until they’re hosted in the Chrome Web Store.’ The company didn’t specify what exactly qualifies the “may” clause, though we expect it may make exceptions for certain popular extensions for a limited time. Google is asking developers to reach out to it if they run into problems or if they ‘think an extension was disabled incorrectly.’”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




An anonymous reader writes “Google today released Chrome version 35 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Android. The new version is mainly for developers, especially those building Web content and apps for mobile devices – this release doesn’t appear to have any new features targeted at the end user. “

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




sfcrazy (1542989) writes “Chromecast is a great device, and concept, however it is more or less limited to Google’s Chrome browser and supported apps. That seems to be changing: Mozilla is working on bringing Chromecast support to its Firefox browser. Mozilla meeting notes from 14 May clearly mention Chromecast support for the browser: ‘Work week in SF, making good progress. Hoping to have Netcast and Chromecast support landed by the end of the week.’”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




sfcrazy (1542989) writes “Chromecast is a great device, and concept, however it is more or less limited to Google’s Chrome browser and supported apps. That seems to be changing: Mozilla is working on bringing Chromecast support to its Firefox browser. Mozilla meeting notes from 14 May clearly mention Chromecast support for the browser: ‘Work week in SF, making good progress. Hoping to have Netcast and Chromecast support landed by the end of the week.’”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


MojoKid (1002251) writes “The address bar in a Web browser has been a standard feature for as long as Web browsers have been around — and that’s not going to be changing. What could be, though, is exactly what sort of information is displayed in them. In December, Google began rolling-out a limited test of a feature in Chrome called “Origin Chip”, a UI element situated to the left of the address bar. What this “chip” does is show the name of the website you’re currently on, while also showing the base URL. To the right, the actual address bar shows nothing, except a prompt to “Search Google or type URL”. With this implementation, a descriptive URL would not be seen in the URL bar. Instead, only the root domain would be seen, but to the left of the actual address bar. This effectively means that no matter which page you’re on in a given website, all you’ll ever see when looking at the address bar is the base URL in the origin chip. What helps here is that the URL is never going to be completely hidden. You’ll still be able to hit Ctrl + L to select it, and hopefully be able to click on the origin chip in order to reveal the entire URL. Google could never get rid of the URL entirely, because it’s required in order to link someone to a direct location, obviously.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




First time accepted submitter AllTheTinfoilHats (3612007) writes “A security flaw in Google Chrome allows any website you visit with the browser to listen in on nearby conversations. It doesn’t allow sites to access your microphone’s audio, but provides them with a transcript of the browser’s speech-to-text transcriptions of anything in range. It was found by a programmer in Israel, who says Google issued a low-priority label to the bug when he reported it, until he wrote about it on his blog and the post started picking up steam on social media. The website has to keep you clicking for eight seconds to keep the microphone on, and Google says it has no timeline for a fix.” However, as discoverer Guy Aharonovsky is quoted, “It seems like they started to look for a way to quickly mitigate this flaw.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




An anonymous reader writes “Google today released Chrome version 34 for Windows, Mac, and Linux. The new version includes support for responsive images, an unprefixed version of the Web Audio API, and importing supervised users. You can update to the latest release now using the browser’s built-in silent updater, or download it directly from google.com/chrome.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




girlmad writes: “Google has scored a major win on the back of Microsoft’s Windows XP support cut-off. The London Borough of Barking and Dagenham has begun moving all its employees over to Samsung Chromebooks and Chromeboxes ahead of the 8 April deadline. The council was previously running 3,500 Windows XP desktops and 800 XP laptops, and is currently in the process of retiring these in favour of around 2,000 Chromebooks and 300 Chromeboxes. It estimates the savings at around £400,000 compared to upgrading to newer Windows machines — no small change.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




MojoKid writes “The Asus Chromebox is a tiny palm-sized machine similar in form and footprint to Intel’s line of NUC (Next Unit of Computing) mini PCs. One of the higher-end Asus Chromebox variants coming to market employs Intel’s 4th generation Haswell Core series processor architecture with Integrated HD 4400 graphics. The machine is packed with fair number of connectivity options including four USB 3.0 SuperSpeed ports, HDMI and DisplayPort output, a microSD Flash card slot, 802.11n dual-band WiFi, and Bluetooth 4.0. It also sports a 1.7GHz dual-core Core i3-4010U processor with Hyper-Threading for four logical processing threads and 4GB of DDR3 1600MHz memory. Finally, the onboard 16GB SSD storage might be appear a bit meager, but it’s backed up by 100GB of Google Drive cloud storage for 2 years. In testing, the device proved to be capable in some quick and dirty browser-based benchmarks. For the class of device and use case that the Chromebox caters to, Google has covered most of what folks look for with the Chrome OS. There’s basic office productivity apps, video and media streaming apps, and even a few games that you might care to fire up. The Asus Chromebox handles all of these usage types with ease and it’s also barely audible while consuming only about 18 Watts under load.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




An anonymous reader writes “Citing ‘code we consider to be permanently “experimental” or “beta,”‘ Google Chrome engineers have no plans on enabling video acceleration in the Chrome/Chromium web browser. Code has been written but is permanently disabled by default because ‘supporting GPU features on Linux is a nightmare’ due to the reported sub-par quality of Linux GPU drivers and many different Linux distributions. Even coming up with a Linux GPU video acceleration white-list has been shot down over fear of the Linux video acceleration code causing stability issues and problems for Chrome developers. What have been your recent experiences with Linux GPU drivers?”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




An anonymous reader writes “On Friday, Chrome 33 was shipped out the everyone on the stable channel. Among other things, it removes the developer flag to disable the “Instant Extended API”, which powers an updated New Tab page. The new New Tab page receieved a large amount of backlash from users, particularly due to strange behavior when Google wasn’t set as the default search engine. It also moves the apps section to a separate page and puts the button to reopen recently closed tabs in the Chrome menu. With the option to disable this change removed, there has been tremendous backlash on Google Chrome’s official forum. The official suggestion from Google as well as OMG! Chrome is to try some New Tab page changing extensions, such as Replace New Tab, Modern New Tab Page, or iChrome.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




kc123 writes “The latest version of Chrome includes improvements in JavaScript compilation, according to the Chromium blog. Historically, Chrome compiled JavaScript on the main thread, where it could interfere with the performance of the JavaScript application. For large pieces of code this could become a nuisance, and in complex applications like games it could even lead to stuttering and dropped frames. In the latest Chrome Beta they’ve enabled concurrent compilation, which offloads a large part of the optimizing compilation phase to a background thread. The result is that JavaScript applications remain responsive and performance gets a boost.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




MojoKid writes “Asus stepped out this morning with something new for the Chrome OS powered hardware crowd, called a “Chromebox” small form factor PC. Just as Google has been evangelizing with its Chromebook notebook initiative, the pitch for these Chromebox systems is that they’re capable of doing everything you need to do in today’s connected world. While not everyone will totally agree with that marketing pitch — gaming, 3D modeling, and a host of specialized tasks are better suited for a PC with higher specs — there’s certainly a market for these types of devices. They’re low cost, fairly well equipped, and able to handle a wide variety of daily computing chores. There are two SKUs being released in the U.S. The first starts at $179 and sports an Intel Celeron 2955U processor, and the second features an Intel Core i3 4010U CPU (no mention of price just yet), both of which are based on Intel’s 4th generation Haswell CPU architecture. Beyond the processor, these fan-less boxes come with two SO-DIMM memory slots with 2GB or 4GB of DDR3-1600 RAM, a 16GB SSD, a GbE LAN port, 802.11n Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4.0, 2-in-1 memory card reader, four USB 3.0 ports, HDMI output, a DisplayPort, an audio jack, and a Kensington Lock. ASUS also includes a VESA mount kit with each Chromebox, and Google tosses in 100GB of Google Drive space free for two years.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




An anonymous reader writes “Last year Google rolled out a new feature for the desktop version of Chrome that enabled support for voice recognition directly into the browser. In September, a developer named Tal Ater found a bug that would allow a malicious site to record through your microphone even after you’d told it to stop. Quoting: ‘When you grant an HTTPS site permission to use your mic, Chrome will remember your choice, and allow the site to start listening in the future, without asking for permission again. This is perfectly fine, as long as Chrome gives you clear indication that you are being listened to, and that the site can’t start listening to you in background windows that are hidden to you. When you click the button to start or stop the speech recognition on the site, what you won’t notice is that the site may have also opened another hidden popunder window. This window can wait until the main site is closed, and then start listening in without asking for permission. This can be done in a window that you never saw, never interacted with, and probably didn’t even know was there.’ Ater reported this to Google in September, and they had a fix ready a few days later. But they haven’t rolled it out yet — they can’t decide whether or not it’s the proper way to block this behavior. Thus: the exploit remains. Ater has published the source code for the exploit to encourage Google to fix it.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




An anonymous reader writes “Ars reports that the developers of moderately popular Chrome extensions are being contacted and offered thousands of dollars to sell ownership of those extensions. The buyers are then adding adware and malware to the extensions and letting the auto-update roll it out to end users. The article says, ‘When Tweet This Page started spewing ads and malware into my browser, the only initial sign was that ads on the Internet had suddenly become much more intrusive, and many auto-played sound. The extension only started injecting ads a few days after it was installed in an attempt to make it more difficult to detect. After a while, Google search became useless, because every link would redirect to some other webpage. My initial thought was to take an inventory of every program I had installed recently—I never suspected an update would bring in malware. I ran a ton of malware/virus scanners, and they all found nothing. I was only clued into the fact that Chrome was the culprit because the same thing started happening on my Chromebook—if I didn’t notice that, the next step would have probably been a full wipe of my computer.’”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




An anonymous reader writes “Google today released Chrome version 32 for Windows, Mac, and Linux. The new version includes tab noise indicators, a new look for Windows 8 Metro mode, and automatic blocking of malware downloads. You can update to the latest release now using the browser’s built-in silent updater, or download it directly from google.com/chrome.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




Chromebooks, and ChromeOS have come a long way, and this year two of the best selling laptops at Amazon are Chromebooks. Computerworld calls it a punch in the gut for Microsoft. “As of late Thursday, the trio retained their lock on the top three places on Amazon’s best-selling-laptop list in the order of Acer, Samsung and Asus. Another Acer Chromebook, one that sports 32GB of on-board storage space — double the 16GB of Acer’s lower-priced model — held the No. 7 spot on the retailer’s top 10. Chromebooks’ holiday success at Amazon was duplicated elsewhere during the year, according to the NPD Group, which tracked U.S. PC sales to commercial buyers such as businesses, schools, government and other organizations. … By NPD’s tallies, Chromebooks accounted for 21% of all U.S. commercial notebook sales in 2013 through November, and 10% of all computers and tablets. Both shares were up massively from 2012; last year, Chromebooks accounted for an almost-invisible two-tenths of one percent of all computer and tablet sales.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




An anonymous reader writes “Google has launched the Google Voice Search Hotword extension for Chrome, bringing the ‘OK Google’ feature to the desktop. You can download the new tool, currently in beta, now directly from the Chrome Web Store. Android users with version 4.4 KitKat will recognize the feature: it lets you talk to Google without first clicking or typing. It’s completely hands-free, provided you’re already on Google.com: just say ‘OK Google’ and then ask your question.” Quick, someone wire Pocketsphinx up to Firefox, or integrate Simon into Krunner.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




An anonymous reader writes “Google’s Chromium team never ceases to amaze. Its latest project is a Chrome app-based Integrated Development Environment (IDE) codenamed Spark. For those who don’t know, Chrome packaged apps are written in HTML, JavaScript, and CSS, but launch outside the browser, work offline by default, and access certain APIs not available to Web apps. In other words, they’re Google’s way of pushing the limits of the Web as a platform.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.