An anonymous reader writes Google today provided an update on its plan to remove Netscape Plugin Application Programming Interface (NPAPI) from Chrome, which the company says will improve the browser’s security, speed, and stability, as well as reduce complexity in the code base. In short, the latest timeline is as follows: Block all plugins by default in January 2015, disable support in April 2015, and remove support completely in September 2015. For context, Google first announced in September 2013 that it was planning to drop NPAPI. At the time, Google said anonymous Chrome usage data showed just six NPAPI plugins were used by more than 5 percent of users, and the company was hoping to remove support from Chrome “before the end of 2014, but the exact timing will depend on usage and user feedback.”

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An anonymous reader writes “Google today released Chrome 39 for Windows, Mac, and Linux. The biggest addition in this release is 64-bit support for OS X, which first arrived in Chrome 38 beta. Unlike on Windows, where 32-bit and 64-bit versions will both continue to be available (users currently have to opt-in to use the 64-bit release), Chrome for Mac is now only available in 64-bit. There are also a number of security fixes and developer features. Here’s the full changelog.

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An anonymous reader writes Chrome OS is based on the Linux kernel and designed by Google to work with web applications and installed applications. Chromebook is one of the best selling laptops on Amazon. However, devs decided to drop support for ext2/3/4 on external drivers and SD card. It seems that ChromiumOS developers can’t implement a script or feature to relabel EXT volumes in the left nav that is insertable and has RW privileges using Files.app. Given that this is the main filesystem in Linux, and is thereby automatically well supported by anything that leverages Linux, this choice makes absolutely no sense. Google may want to drop support for external storage and push the cloud storage on everyone. Overall Linux users and community members are not happy at all.

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An anonymous reader writes: In addition to updating Chrome for iOS, Google has released Chrome 38 for Windows, Mac, and Linux. While Chrome 38 beta brought a slew of new features, the stable release is pretty much just a massive security update. This means that, with Chrome 38, Google isn’t adding any features to the stable channel (full changelog). That said, Chrome 38 does address 159 security issues (including 113 “relatively minor ones”). Google spent $75,633.70 in bug bounties for this release.

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darthcamaro (735685) writes “Forget about HTML5, that’s already passe — Google is already moving on to HTML5.1 support for the upcoming Chrome 38 release. Currently only a beta, one of the biggest things that web developers will notice is the use of the new “picture” tag which is a container for multiple image sizes/formats. Bottom line is it’s a new way to think about the “IMG” tag that has existed since the first HTML spec.”

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Gamoid writes At VMworld today, VMware introduced the Workplace Suite, a platform for securely delivering applications and content across desktops and mobile devices from the cloud. The really cool part, though, is a partnership with Google and NVIDIA to deliver even graphics-intensive Windows applications on a Chromebook. From the article: “The new VMware Workplace Suite takes advantage of three existing VMware products: Tools for application, device, and content management as well as secure cloud file storage that comes from the January acquisition of enterprise mobile management company AirWatch; VMware Horizon for desktop-as-a-service; and brand-new acquisition CloudVolumes for app delivery. “

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New submitter nrjperera (2669521) submits news of a new laptop from HP that’s in Chromebook (or, a few years ago, “netbook”) territory, price-wise, but loaded with Windows 8.1 instead. Microsoft has teamed up with HP to make an affordable Windows laptop to beat Google Chromebooks at their own game. German website Mobile Geeks have found some leaked information about this upcoming HP laptop dubbed Stream 14, including its specifications. According to the leaked data sheet the HP Stream 14 laptop will share similar specs to HP’s cheap Chromebook. It will be shipped with an AMD A4 Micro processor, 2GB of RAM, 32GB of flash storage and a display with 1,366 x 768 screen resolution. Microsoft will likely offer 100GB of OneDrive cloud storage with the device to balance the limited storage option.

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An anonymous reader writes “Google is toying with a complete revamp of the user account system in its browser. Google is essentially pulling the user management system from Chrome OS back into Chrome. The company’s thinking is likely two-layered. First, it wants users to stay in the browser for as long as possible, and thus it wants the switching process to be part of Chrome as opposed to Windows, Mac, or Linux. Second, if it can teach users to have accounts in Chrome (as well as use incognito and guest modes), the learning curve will have been flattened for when they encounter Chrome OS.”

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An anonymous reader writes “Beginning with the Chrome 38 Beta it’s now possible to watch Netflix without any Wine/Silverlight plug-ins but will work natively using Chrome’s DRM-HTML5 video capabilities with Netflix. The steps just involve using the latest beta of Chrome and an HTTP user-agent switcher to tell Netflix you’re a Windows Chrome user, due to Netflix arbitrarily blocking the Linux build.”

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Nexus Unplugged (2495076) writes ‘On their security blog today, Google announced a new Chrome extension called “End-To-End” intended to make browser-based encryption of messages easier for users. The extension, which was rumored to be “underway” a couple months ago, is currently in an “alpha” version and is not yet available pre-packaged or in the Chrome Web Store. It utilizes a Javascript implementation of OpenPGP, meaning that your private keys are never sent to Google. However, if you’d like to use the extension on multiple machines, its keyring is saved in localStorage, which can be encrypted with a passphrase before being synced. The extension still qualifies for Google’s Vulnerability Reward Program, and joins a host of PGP-related extensions already available for Chrome.’ Google also published a report showing how much email is encrypted in transit between Gmail addresses and those from other providers.

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An anonymous reader writes “Google has begun blocking local Chrome extensions to protect Windows users. This means that as of today, extensions can be installed in Chrome for Windows only if they’re hosted on the Chrome Web Store. Furthermore, Google says extensions that were previously installed ‘may be automatically disabled and cannot be re-enabled or re-installed until they’re hosted in the Chrome Web Store.’ The company didn’t specify what exactly qualifies the “may” clause, though we expect it may make exceptions for certain popular extensions for a limited time. Google is asking developers to reach out to it if they run into problems or if they ‘think an extension was disabled incorrectly.’”

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An anonymous reader writes “Google today released Chrome version 35 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Android. The new version is mainly for developers, especially those building Web content and apps for mobile devices – this release doesn’t appear to have any new features targeted at the end user. “

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sfcrazy (1542989) writes “Chromecast is a great device, and concept, however it is more or less limited to Google’s Chrome browser and supported apps. That seems to be changing: Mozilla is working on bringing Chromecast support to its Firefox browser. Mozilla meeting notes from 14 May clearly mention Chromecast support for the browser: ‘Work week in SF, making good progress. Hoping to have Netcast and Chromecast support landed by the end of the week.’”

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sfcrazy (1542989) writes “Chromecast is a great device, and concept, however it is more or less limited to Google’s Chrome browser and supported apps. That seems to be changing: Mozilla is working on bringing Chromecast support to its Firefox browser. Mozilla meeting notes from 14 May clearly mention Chromecast support for the browser: ‘Work week in SF, making good progress. Hoping to have Netcast and Chromecast support landed by the end of the week.’”

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MojoKid (1002251) writes “The address bar in a Web browser has been a standard feature for as long as Web browsers have been around — and that’s not going to be changing. What could be, though, is exactly what sort of information is displayed in them. In December, Google began rolling-out a limited test of a feature in Chrome called “Origin Chip”, a UI element situated to the left of the address bar. What this “chip” does is show the name of the website you’re currently on, while also showing the base URL. To the right, the actual address bar shows nothing, except a prompt to “Search Google or type URL”. With this implementation, a descriptive URL would not be seen in the URL bar. Instead, only the root domain would be seen, but to the left of the actual address bar. This effectively means that no matter which page you’re on in a given website, all you’ll ever see when looking at the address bar is the base URL in the origin chip. What helps here is that the URL is never going to be completely hidden. You’ll still be able to hit Ctrl + L to select it, and hopefully be able to click on the origin chip in order to reveal the entire URL. Google could never get rid of the URL entirely, because it’s required in order to link someone to a direct location, obviously.”

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First time accepted submitter AllTheTinfoilHats (3612007) writes “A security flaw in Google Chrome allows any website you visit with the browser to listen in on nearby conversations. It doesn’t allow sites to access your microphone’s audio, but provides them with a transcript of the browser’s speech-to-text transcriptions of anything in range. It was found by a programmer in Israel, who says Google issued a low-priority label to the bug when he reported it, until he wrote about it on his blog and the post started picking up steam on social media. The website has to keep you clicking for eight seconds to keep the microphone on, and Google says it has no timeline for a fix.” However, as discoverer Guy Aharonovsky is quoted, “It seems like they started to look for a way to quickly mitigate this flaw.”

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An anonymous reader writes “Google today released Chrome version 34 for Windows, Mac, and Linux. The new version includes support for responsive images, an unprefixed version of the Web Audio API, and importing supervised users. You can update to the latest release now using the browser’s built-in silent updater, or download it directly from google.com/chrome.”

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girlmad writes: “Google has scored a major win on the back of Microsoft’s Windows XP support cut-off. The London Borough of Barking and Dagenham has begun moving all its employees over to Samsung Chromebooks and Chromeboxes ahead of the 8 April deadline. The council was previously running 3,500 Windows XP desktops and 800 XP laptops, and is currently in the process of retiring these in favour of around 2,000 Chromebooks and 300 Chromeboxes. It estimates the savings at around £400,000 compared to upgrading to newer Windows machines — no small change.”

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MojoKid writes “The Asus Chromebox is a tiny palm-sized machine similar in form and footprint to Intel’s line of NUC (Next Unit of Computing) mini PCs. One of the higher-end Asus Chromebox variants coming to market employs Intel’s 4th generation Haswell Core series processor architecture with Integrated HD 4400 graphics. The machine is packed with fair number of connectivity options including four USB 3.0 SuperSpeed ports, HDMI and DisplayPort output, a microSD Flash card slot, 802.11n dual-band WiFi, and Bluetooth 4.0. It also sports a 1.7GHz dual-core Core i3-4010U processor with Hyper-Threading for four logical processing threads and 4GB of DDR3 1600MHz memory. Finally, the onboard 16GB SSD storage might be appear a bit meager, but it’s backed up by 100GB of Google Drive cloud storage for 2 years. In testing, the device proved to be capable in some quick and dirty browser-based benchmarks. For the class of device and use case that the Chromebox caters to, Google has covered most of what folks look for with the Chrome OS. There’s basic office productivity apps, video and media streaming apps, and even a few games that you might care to fire up. The Asus Chromebox handles all of these usage types with ease and it’s also barely audible while consuming only about 18 Watts under load.”

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An anonymous reader writes “Citing ‘code we consider to be permanently “experimental” or “beta,”‘ Google Chrome engineers have no plans on enabling video acceleration in the Chrome/Chromium web browser. Code has been written but is permanently disabled by default because ‘supporting GPU features on Linux is a nightmare’ due to the reported sub-par quality of Linux GPU drivers and many different Linux distributions. Even coming up with a Linux GPU video acceleration white-list has been shot down over fear of the Linux video acceleration code causing stability issues and problems for Chrome developers. What have been your recent experiences with Linux GPU drivers?”

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