There are still many users of other operating systems who think that Linux is behind Mac OS X and Windows in terms of desktop design, but the reality is just the other way around.

If you really love taking tests with Prometric, do ‘em before Christmas

Microsoft will part ways with Prometric, the outfit that currently provides exams for some of Redmond’s certifications.…

Ryan Icculus Gordon has just recently been on a guest on the excellent Linux Action Show to talk about Linux gaming. Ryan Icculus Gordon is the name behind a number of big ports.

An anonymous reader writes: A few days ago we talked over some of the difficulties faced by makers of autonomous car software, like dealing with weather, construction, and parking garages. Today, the NY Times has a similar article about delivery drones, examining the safety and regulatory problems that must be solved in addition to getting the basic technology ready. “[R]researchers at NASA are working on ways to manage that menagerie of low-flying aircraft. At NASA’s Moffett Field, about four miles from Google’s headquarters in Mountain View, Calif., the agency has been developing a drone traffic management program that would in effect be a separate air traffic control system for things that fly low to the ground — around 400 to 500 feet for most drones. Much like the air traffic control system for conventional aircraft, the program would monitor the skies for weather and traffic. Wind is a particular hazard, because drones weigh so little compared with regular planes.” Beyond that, the sheer scale of infrastructure necessary to get drone delivery up and running in cities across the U.S. is staggering. Commercial drones aren’t going to have much range, particularly when carrying something heavy. They’ll be noisy, and the products they’re transporting will still need to be relatively close by. What other issues do Amazon, DHL, Google, and other need to solve?

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Epiphany hits Raspberry Pi founders, users

Epiphany, the new Pi-specific browser, that is, not some mystical revelation

The Raspberry Pi now has its very own web browser.…

Sex-in-space geckos killed by frigidity

Russian reptiles rue re-entry heater error

Russia’s space agency has made the announcement we all feared: after being launched, lost, and recovered, its famous “sex geckos” have died.…

84,000-plus law enforcement requests, but for what?

Telstra probably thought it was doing the right thing by joining other big names and publishing a transparency report. Instead, it’s become a focus of criticism for, in the eyes of ‘net freedom advocates, handing over too much customer information on too little pretext.…

VMware goes deeper on OpenStack

If you think VMware has just been fooling around with OpenStack, think again. Oh sure, VMware would prefer if you bought into vCloud Air, but VMware didn’t need a weatherman to know which way the clouds were moving. They’re moving to open source’s OpenStack.

Teams with Red Hat to add SDN so containerised apps can get to work faster

Cisco has climbed aboard the containerisation cloudwagon, hinting that it will make Docker and Linux containers a part of its emerging “Intercloud”.…

An anonymous reader writes “Back in August, groups of Russian hackers assembled the biggest list of compromised login credentials ever seen: 1.2 billion accounts. Now, domain registrar Namecheap reports the hackers have begun using the list to try and access accounts. “Overnight, our intrusion detection systems alerted us to a much higher than normal load against our login systems. … The group behind this is using the stored usernames and passwords to simulate a web browser login through fake browser software. This software simulates the actual login process a user would use if they are using Firefox/Safari/Chrome to access their Namecheap account. The hackers are going through their username/password list and trying each and every one to try and get into Namecheap user accounts.” They report that most login attempts are failing, but some are succeeding. Now is a good time to check that none of your important accounts share passwords.”

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Vuln: Oracle Java SE CVE-2014-4221 Remote Security Vulnerability

Oracle Java SE CVE-2014-4221 Remote Security Vulnerability

Vuln: Oracle Java SE CVE-2014-4208 Remote Security Vulnerability

Oracle Java SE CVE-2014-4208 Remote Security Vulnerability

Vuln: Oracle Java SE CVE-2014-4227 Remote Security Vulnerability

Oracle Java SE CVE-2014-4227 Remote Security Vulnerability

Vuln: Oracle Java SE CVE-2014-4209 Remote Security Vulnerability

Oracle Java SE CVE-2014-4209 Remote Security Vulnerability

An anonymous reader writes: Rumors of back door access to Skype have plagued the communication software for the better part of a decade. Even if it’s not true, Skype is owned by Microsoft, which is beholden to data requests from law enforcement. Because of these issues, a group of developers started work on Tox, which aims to rebuild the functionality of Skype with an emphasis on privacy. “The main thing the Tox team is trying to do, besides provide encryption, is create a tool that requires no central servers whatsoever—not even ones that you would host yourself. It relies on the same technology that BitTorrent uses to provide direct connections between users, so there’s no central hub to snoop on or take down.”

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Tesla to add charging network in China

400 stations in deal with China Unicom

Tesla has announced that it intends to build a huge charging network in China: 400 stations in 120 cities, and 20 supercharging stations.…

Carrier club’s careful copyright conga

We’re not Big Content’s interns, says Comms Alliance, but we might be RENT-A-COPS

Australia’s carriers club, the Communications Alliance, has published its submission to the federal government’s copyright inquiry after an early copy hit media inboxes.…

Don’t get me wrong, Android is a beautiful operating system if ever there was one – and dumbed down to the max, which makes it even more beautiful in the minds of many mobile users. Indeed, you can play on an Android device all day without ever even realizing that you’re working with an operating system or even a computer. Just swipe away and see what they’ll try to sell you next.

Australia’s technology industries need to fight for the best-possible FTTN

At a conference early this year, I attended a talk by a major Australian industry association. The talk’s only good feature was its possible use as a cure for insomnia.…

blottsie writes In a move out of the anti-SOPA campaign playbook, Fight for the Future and other net neutrality activist groups have set up the Battle for the Net coalition, which plans to launch an “Internet slowdown day” later this month. No actual traffic will be slowed down. Instead, participating sites will display embeddable modules that include a spinning “loading” symbol and information about contacting the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), the White House, and members of Congress.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.