A new stable release of the G’MIC image-processing
framework was recently released. Version 1.6.0 adds a number of new commands and filters useful for manipulating image data, as well as
changes to the codebase that will hopefully make G’MIC easier to
integrate into other applications.

Click below (subscribers only) for a look at the G’MIC 1.6.0 release and
associated GIMP plugin.

In today’s open source roundup: Microsoft may be using cloak and dagger tactics to attack open source and protect Windows. Plus: John Dvorak smacks the Linux beehive for page views, and don’t forget developer stability when choosing a Linux distro.

How to secure a LAMP server on CentOS or RHEL

 xmodulo: In this article we will assume that each component of the stack is already up and running, and will focus exclusively on securing the LAMP server(s).

Crystal Picnic is a fantastic looking 2D RPG that is created as a tribute to the old action RPG games. Created by “Nooskewl” the developers of Monster RPG 2.

Yesterday we had a story titled ‘IBM Gearing Up Mega Power 8 Servers For October Launch.’ In the intro Timothy wrote, ‘…watch for a video interview with Balog on how he’s helping spend the billion dollars that IBM pledged last year on open source development.’ This is that video, and in it Balog tells us how much IBM loves Linux and open source, and how they’re partnering with multiple distros, recently including Ubuntu. So get ready for Power 8 servers in October. IBM is pushing them like mad — especially in the Linux/FOSS realm. (Alternate Video Link)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




FCC warned mega-gobble could price citizens out of the internet

The mayors of the two largest cities in America have sent letters to US watchdog the FCC expressing their concerns over the proposed merger between cable giants Comcast and Time Warner Cable (TWC).…

SternisheFan sends this report from Universe Today: How does microgravity affect your health? One of the chief concerns of NASA astronauts these days is changes to eyesight. Some people come back from long-duration stays in space with what appears to be permanent changes, such as requiring glasses when previously they did not. And the numbers are interesting. A few months after NASA [said] 20% of astronauts may face this problem, a new study points out that 21 U.S. astronauts that have flown on the International Space Station for long flights (which tend to be five to six months) face visual problems. These include “hyperopic shift, scotoma and choroidal folds to cotton wool spots, optic nerve sheath distension, globe flattening and edema of the optic nerve,” states the University of Houston, which is collaborating with NASA on a long-term study of astronauts while they’re in orbit.

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SteamOS Beta 133 Released

 GamingOnLinux: The latest and greatest from Valve’s Gaming OS! Now with a newer Linux kernel and an updated Nvidia Driver!

Vuln: Lua ‘ldo.c’ Remote Code Execution Vulnerability

Lua ‘ldo.c’ Remote Code Execution Vulnerability

The offer was too good to be true. Three whole weeks at the NASA Glenn Research Center and an invitation to come back. I could scarcely believe it when I read the email. I immediately forwarded it to my parents with an addition of around 200 exclamation points. They were all for it, so I responded to my contact, Herb Schilling, with a resounding “YES!”read more

Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death

Microsoft has reissued a security patch for Windows that previously caused PCs to suffer blue screens of death. The new release comes 10 days after Redmond advised people to uninstall the dodgy update.…

schwit1 sends word that the Dept. of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has given notice of a proposal (PDF) for a new car safety standard that would require vehicle-to-vehicle communication equipment in all new passenger cars and light trucks. The NHTSA thinks this will facilitate the development of new safety software for vehicles. They estimate it could prevent over 500,000 crashes (PDF) each year. “Some crash warning V2V applications, like Intersection Movement Assist and Left Turn Assist, rely on V2V-based messages to obtain information to detect and then warn drivers of possible safety risks in situations where other technologies have less capability. … NHTSA believes that V2V capability will not develop absent regulation, because there would not be any immediate safety benefits for consumers who are early adopters of V2V.” The submitter notes that this V2V communication would include transmission of a vehicle’s location, which comes with privacy concerns.

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This week, we look at VMware embracing OpenStack, HP still rejecting a Rackspace purchase and the strange case of Eucalyptus joining OpenStack.

NetworkWorld: A rant on a particularly frustrating aspect of Linux – re-compiling the kernel.

snydeq writes: Developers are embracing a range of open source technologies, writes Matt Asay, virtually none of which are supported or sold by Red Hat, the purported open source leader. “Ask a CIO her choice to run mission-critical workloads, and her answer is a near immediate ‘Red Hat.’ Ask her developers what they prefer, however, and it’s Ubuntu. Outside the operating system, according to AngelList data compiled by Leo Polovets, these developers go with MySQL, MongoDB, or PostgreSQL for their database; Chef or Puppet for configuration; and ElasticSearch or Solr for search. None of this technology is developed by Red Hat. Yet all of this technology is what the next generation of developers is using to build modern applications. Given that developers are the new kingmakers, Red Hat needs to get out in front of the developer freight train if it wants to remain relevant for the next 20 years, much less the next two.”

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Several readers sent word that U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill (D-MO) has begun speaking in favor of mandatory cameras for police across the country. “Everywhere I go people now have cameras. And police officers are now at a disadvantage, because someone can tape the last part of an encounter and not tape the first part of the encounter. And it gives the impression that the police officer has overreacted when they haven’t.” This follows the recent controversy ove the shooting death of Michael Brown in a police incident, as well as a White House petition on the subject that rocketed to 100,000 signatures. McCaskill continued, “I would like to see us say, ‘If you want federal funding in your community, you’ve got to have body cams on your officers. And I think that would go a long way towards solving some of these problems, and it would be a great legacy over this tragedy that’s occurred in Ferguson, regardless of what the facts say at the end as to whether or not anyone is criminally culpable.”

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Statoil, the gas giant behind the Scandie social miracle, targeted

More than 50 Norwegian oil and energy companies have been hacked by unknown attackers, according to government security authorities.…

NASA is constantly working on projects that will eventually be useful in the outer space and on alien planets, and it looks like they are going there with the help of Linux and Ubuntu.

MakeTechEasier:: The netstat comand is an essential tool for network administration

vinces99 (2792707) writes Scientists have developed what they believe is the thinnest-possible semiconductor, a new class of nanoscale materials made in sheets only three atoms thick. The University of Washington researchers have demonstrated that two of these single-layer semiconductor materials can be connected in an atomically seamless fashion known as a heterojunction. This result could be the basis for next-generation flexible and transparent computing, better light-emitting diodes, or LEDs, and solar technologies. “Heterojunctions are fundamental elements of electronic and photonic devices,” said senior author Xiaodong Xu, a UW assistant professor of materials science and engineering and of physics. “Our experimental demonstration of such junctions between two-dimensional materials should enable new kinds of transistors, LEDs, nanolasers, and solar cells to be developed for highly integrated electronic and optical circuits within a single atomic plane.”

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